Arbitrary Qt extensions with Go QML

As part of the on going work on Ubuntu Touch phones, I was invited to contribute a Go package to interface with ubuntuoneauth, a C++ and Qt library that authenticates against Ubuntu One using the system account made available by the phone owner. The details of that library and its use case are not interesting for most people right now, but the work to interface with it is a good example to talk about because, besides the result (uoneauth) being an external and independent Go package that extends the qml package, ubuntuoneauth is not a QML library, but rather a plain Qt library. Some of the callbacks use even traditional C++ types that do not inherit from QObject and have no Qt metadata, so offering that functionality from Go nicely takes a bit more work.

What follows are some of the highlights of that integration logic, to serve as a reference for similar extensions in the future. Note that if your interest is in creating QML applications with Go, none of this is necessary and the documentation is a better place to start.

As an initial step, the following examples demonstrate how the original C++ library and the Go package being designed are meant to be used. The first snippet contains the relevant logic taken out of the examples/signing-main.cpp file, tweaked for clarity:

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    (...)
    UbuntuOne::SigningExample *example = new UbuntuOne::SigningExample(&a);
    QTimer::singleShot(0, example, SLOT(doExample()));
    (...)
}

SigningExample::SigningExample(QObject *parent) : QObject(parent) {
    QObject::connect(&service, SIGNAL(credentialsFound(const Token&)),
                     this, SLOT(handleCredentialsFound(Token)));
    QObject::connect(&service, SIGNAL(credentialsNotFound()),
                     this, SLOT(handleCredentialsNotFound()));
    (...)
}

void SigningExample::doExample() {
    service.getCredentials();
}

void SigningExample::handleCredentialsFound(Token token) {
    QString authHeader = token.signUrl(url, QStringLiteral("GET"));
    (...)
}
 
void SigningExample::handleCredentialsNotFound() {
    qDebug() << "No credentials were found.";
}

The example hooks into various signals in the service, one for each possible outcome, and then calls the service’s getCredentials method to initiate the process. If successful, the credentialsFound signal is emitted with a Token value that is able to sign URLs, returning an HTTP header that can authenticate a request.

That same process is more straightforward when using the library from Go:

service := uoneauth.NewService(engine)
token, err := service.Token()
if err != nil {
        return err
}
signature := token.HeaderSignature("GET", url)

Again, this gets a service, a token from it, and signs a URL, in a “forward” way.

So the goal is turning the initial C++ workflow into this simpler Go API. A good next step is looking into how the NewService function is implemented:

func NewService(engine *qml.Engine) *Service {
        s := &Service{reply: make(chan reply, 1)}

        qml.RunMain(func() {
                s.obj = *qml.CommonOf(C.newSSOService(), engine)
        })

        runtime.SetFinalizer(s, (*Service).finalize)

        s.obj.On("credentialsFound", s.credentialsFound)
        s.obj.On("credentialsNotFound", s.credentialsNotFound)
        s.obj.On("twoFactorAuthRequired", s.twoFactorAuthRequired)
        s.obj.On("requestFailed", s.requestFailed)
        return s
}

NewService creates the service instance, and then asks the qml package to run some logic in the main Qt thread via RunMain. This is necessary because a number of operations in Qt, including the creation of objects, are associated with the currently running thread. Using RunMain in this case ensures that the creation of the C++ object performed by newSSOService happens in the main Qt thread (the “GUI thread”).

Then, the address of the C++ UbuntuOne::SSOService type is handed to CommonOf to obtain a Common value that implements all the common logic supported by C++ types that inherit from QObject. This is an unsafe operation as there’s no way for CommonOf to guarantee that the provided address indeed points to a C++ value with a type that inherits from QObject, so the call site must necessarily import the unsafe package to provide the unsafe.Pointer parameter. That’s not a problem in this context, though, since such extension packages are necessarily dealing with unsafe logic in either case.

The obtained Common value is then assigned to the service’s obj field. In most cases, that value is instead assigned to an anonymous Common field, as done in qml.Window for example. Doing so means qml.Window values implement the qml.Object interface, and may be manipulated as a generic object. For the new Service type, though, the fact that this is a generic object won’t be disclosed for the moment, and instead a simpler API will be offered.

Following the function logic further, a finalizer is then registered to ensure the C++ value gets deallocated if the developer forgets to Close the service explicitly. When doing that, it’s important to ensure the Close method drops the finalizer when called, not only to facilitate the garbage collection of the object, but also to avoid deallocating the same value twice.

The next four lines in the function should be straightforward: they register methods of the service to be called when the relevant signals are emitted. Here is the implementation of two of these methods:

func (s *Service) credentialsFound(token *Token) {
        s.sendReply(reply{token: token})
}

func (s *Service) credentialsNotFound() {
        s.sendReply(reply{err: ErrNoCreds})
}

func (s *Service) sendReply(r reply) {
        select {
        case s.reply <- r:
        default:
                panic("internal error: multiple results received")
        }
}

Handling the signals consists of just sending the reply over the channel to whoever initiated the request. The select statement in sendReply just ensures that the invariant of having a reply per request is not broken without being noticed, as that would require a slightly different design.

There’s one more point worth observing in this logic: the token value received as a parameter in credentialsFound was already converted into the local Token type. In most cases, this is unnecessary as the parameter is directly useful as a qml.Object or as another native type (int, etc), but in this case UbuntuOne::Token is a plain C++ type that does not inherit from QObject, so the default signal parameter that would arrive in the Go method has only a type name and the value address.

Instead of taking the plain value, it is turned into a more useful one by registering a converter with the qml package:

func convertToken(engine *qml.Engine, obj qml.Object) interface{} {
        // Copy as the one held by obj is passed by reference.
        addr := unsafe.Pointer(obj.Property("plainAddr").(uintptr))
        token := &Token{C.tokenCopy(addr)}
        runtime.SetFinalizer(token, (*Token).finalize)
        return token
}

func init() {
        qml.RegisterConverter("Token", convertToken)
}

Given that setup, the Service.Token method may simply call the getCredentials method from the underlying UbuntuOne::SSOService method to fire a request, and block waiting for a reply:

func (s *Service) Token() (*Token, error) {
        s.mu.Lock()
        qml.RunMain(func() {
                C.ssoServiceGetCredentials(unsafe.Pointer(s.obj.Addr()))
        })
        reply := <-s.reply
        s.mu.Unlock()
        return reply.token, reply.err
}

The lock ensures that a second request won’t take place before the first one is done, forcing the correct sequencing of replies. Given the current logic, this isn’t strictly necessary since all requests are equivalent, but this will remain correct even if other methods from SSOService are added to this interface.

The returned Token value may then be used to sign URLs by simply calling the respective underlying method:

func (t *Token) HeaderSignature(method, url string) string {
        cmethod, curl := C.CString(method), C.CString(url)
        cheader := C.tokenSignURL(t.addr, cmethod, curl, 0)
        defer freeCStrings(cmethod, curl, cheader)
        return C.GoString(cheader)
}

No care about using qml.RunMain has to be taken in this case, because UbuntuOne::Token is a simple C++ type that does not interact with the Qt machinery.

This completes the journey of creating a package that provides access to the ubuntuoneauth library from Go code. In many cases it’s a better idea to simply rewrite the logic in Go, but there will be situations similar to this library, where either rewriting would take more time than reasonable, or perhaps delegating the maintenance and stabilization of the underlying logic to a different team is the best thing to do. In those cases, an approach such as the one exposed here can easily solve the problem.

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