An AVR assembly test suite

About a year ago I ordered a pack of 10 atmega328p processors from China to play with. They took a while to get here, and it took even longer for me to get back to them, but a few days ago the motivation to start doing something finally appeared.

I’ve never actually played with AVRs before, and felt a bit like I was jumping a step in my electronics enthusiast progress by not diving into its architecture a bit more deeply. Also, despite the obvious advantages of ARM-based chips these days, the platform is still interesting in some perspectives, such as its widespread availability, low price in small quantities, and the ability to plug them in a breadboard and do things without pretty much any circuitry.

To get acquainted with the architecture and to depart from things I work on more frequently, the project is so far taking the shape of an assembly library of functionality relevant for developing small projects, built mainly around binutils for the AVR. I did end up cheating a bit and compiling the assembly code via avr-gcc, just to get the __do_copy_data initialization routine injected, so that I don’t have to pull up the .data section from program memory into RAM manually.

Continue reading

Twik: a tiny language for Go

As part of one of the projects we’ve been pushing at Canonical, I spent a few days researching about the possibility of extending a compiled Go application with a tiny language that would allow expressing simple procedural logic in a controlled environment. Although we’re not yet sure of the direction we’ll take, the result of this short experiment is being released as the twik language for open fiddling.

Continue reading

Reference strepr implementation

In an effort to polish the recently released draft of the strepr v1 specification, I’ve spent the last couple of days in a Go reference implementation.

The implemented algorithm is relatively simple, efficient, and consumes a conservative amount of memory. The aspect of it that deserved the most attention is the efficient encoding of a float number when it carries an integer value, as covered before. The provided tests are a useful reference as well.

Continue reading

strepr v1 (draft2)

Note: This is a candidate version of the specification. This note will be removed once v1 is closed, and any changes will be described at the end. Please get in touch if you’re implementing it.



This specification defines strepr, a stable representation that enables computing hashes and cryptographic signatures out of a defined set of composite values that is commonly found across a number of languages and applications.

Although the defined representation is a serialization format, it isn’t meant to be used as a traditional one. It may not be seen entirely in memory at once, or written to disk, or sent across the network. Its role is specifically in aiding the generation of hashes and signatures for values that are serialized via other means (JSON, BSON, YAML, HTTP headers or query parameters, configuration files, etc).

Continue reading

The heart of juju

The very first time the concepts behind the juju project were presented, by then still under the prototype name of Ubuntu Pipes, was about four years ago, in July of 2009. It was a short meeting with Mark Shuttleworth, Simon Wardley, and myself, when Canonical still had an office on a tall building by the Thames. That was just the seed of a long road of meetings and presentations that eventually led to the codification of these ideas into what today is a major component of the Ubuntu strategy on servers.

Despite having covered the core concepts many times in those meetings and presentations, it recently occurred to me that they were never properly written down in any reasonable form. This is an omission that I’ll attempt to fix with this post while still holding the proper context in mind and while things haven’t changed too much.

Continue reading

In-flight deb packages of Go

Since relatively early in the public life of the Go language, I’ve been involved in pushing forward packages that might be used in Ubuntu, including making the compiler suite itself happier in such packaged environments. In due time, these packages were moved over to an automatic build system, so that people wouldn’t have to rely on my good will to have up-to-date packages, nor would I have to be regularly spending time maintaining those packages. Or so was the theory.

Continue reading

Efficient XPath for Go

This week I found some time to work on another small spin-off from the juju project at Canonical, and I’m happy to make it openly available today: the xmlpath package, which implements an efficient and strict subset of the XPath specification for the Go language.

This new package will be used in an upcoming (and long due) revision of the goamz package API, which is currently limited by the fact that once the XML result returned by Amazon is unmarshalled into a static structure, any other data that the package wasn’t prepared to deal with becomes hard to access by clients. This problem is being solved by parsing the tree into an intermediary form which can then have XPath expressions conveniently and efficiently applied to it.

Continue reading

Gopher-powered backups

10gen, the company behind the MongoDB database, recently announced the availability of the MongoDB Backup Service. This is not a traditional backup service, though. Rather than simply sending scheduled snapshots of the data over to a remote system, the backup service has an agent sitting next to the database that monitors its operation log, and streams the individual operations over to the remote backup servers. This model enables the service to offer some non-conventional features, such as restoring the state of the database at any point in the last 24h, in addition to more traditional snapshots over longer periods.

Continue reading