The last 4 years (and the next N?)

Some interesting changes have been happening in my professional life, so I wanted to share it here to update friends and also for me to keep track of things over time (at some point I will be older and will certainly laugh at what I called “interesting changes” in the ol’days). Given the goal, I apologize but this may come across as more egocentric than usual, so please feel free to jump over to your next blog post at any time.

It’s been little more than four years since I left Conectiva / Mandriva and joined Canonical, in August of 2005. Shortly after I joined, I had the luck of spending a few months working on the different projects which the company was pushing at the time, including Launchpad, then Bazaar, then a little bit on some projects which didn’t end up seeing much light. It was a great experience by itself, since all of these projects were abundant in talent. Following that, in the beginning of 2006, counting on the trust of people which knew more than I did, I was requested/allowed to lead the development of a brand new project the company wanted to attempt. After a few months of research I had the chance to sit next to Chris Armstrong and Jamu Kakar to bootstrap the development of what is now known as the Landscape distributed systems management project.

Fast forward three and a half years, in mid 2009, and Landscape became a massive project with hundreds of thousands of very well tested lines, sprawling not only a client branch, but also external child projects such as the Storm Object Relational Mapper, in use also by Launchpad and Ubuntu One. In the commercial side of things it looks like Landscape’s life is just starting, with its hosted and standalone versions getting more and more attention from enterprise customers. And the three guys which started the project didn’t do it alone, for sure. The toy project of early 2006 has grown to become a well structured team, with added talent spreading areas such as development, business and QA.

While I wasn’t watching, though, something happened. Facing that great action, my attention was slowly being spread thinly among management, architecture, development, testing, code reviews, meetings, and other tasks, sometimes in areas not entirely related, but very interesting of course. The net result of increased attention sprawl isn’t actually good, though. If it persists, even when the several small tasks may be individually significant, the achievement just doesn’t feel significant given the invested effort as a whole. At least not for someone that truly enjoys being a software architect, and loves to feel that the effort invested in the growth of a significant working software is really helping people out in the same magnitude of that investment. In simpler words, it felt like my position within the team just wasn’t helping the team out the same way it did before, and thus it was time for a change.

Last July an external factor helped to catapult that change. Eucalyptus needed a feature to be released with Ubuntu 9.10, due in October, to greatly simplify the installation of some standard machine images.. an Image Store. It felt like a very tight schedule, even more considering that I hadn’t been doing Java for a while, and Eucalyptus uses some sexy (and useful) new technology called the Google Web Toolkit, something I had to get acquainted with. Two months looked like a tight schedule, and a risky bet overall, but it also felt like a great opportunity to strongly refocus on a task that needed someone’s attention urgently. Again I was blessed with trust I’m thankful for, and by now I’m relieved to look back and perceive that it went alright, certainly thanks to the help of other people like Sidnei da Silva and Mathias Gug. Meanwhile, on the Landscape side, my responsibilities were distributed within the team so that I could be fully engaged on the problem.

Moving this forward a little bit we reach the current date. Right now the Landscape project has a new organizational structure, and it actually feels like it’s moving along quite well. Besides the internal changes, a major organizational change also took place around Landscape over that period, and the planned restructuring led me to my current role. In practice, I’m now engaging into the research of a new concept which I’m hoping to publish openly quite soon, if everything goes well. It’s challenging, it’s exciting, and most importantly, allows me to focus strongly on something which has a great potential (I will stop teasing you now). In addition to this, I’ll definitely be spending some of that time on the progress of Landscape and the Image Store, but mostly from an architectural point of view, since both of these projects will have bright hands taking care of them more closely.

Sit by the fireside if you’re interested in the upcoming chapters of that story. ;-)

5 thoughts on “The last 4 years (and the next N?)

  1. Roberto Teixeira

    I’m very glad that you seem to be happy.

    I’m sure whatever it is you’re going to be working on is going to be a success. I think I told you this already, but it’s never too much: I’m a big admirer of you as a programmer and happy to call you a friend.

    Keep it up, tchĂȘ!

  2. Michael R. Bernstein

    “After a few months of research I had the chance to sit next to Chris Armstrong and Jamu Kakar to bootstrap the development of what is now known as the Landscape distributed systems management project.”

    Was that at PyCon?

  3. Gustavo Niemeyer Post author

    Hey Michael,

    We did have a sprint next to PyCon once, but the actual bootstrapping of the project was actually in a sprint in Vancouver.

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